Article

Römerberg

Römerberg (Römerberg, Frankfurt) – this is the center of Frankfurt (the name means “Roman Mountain” in German). Here, visitors will find City Hall (which was originally built in 1405). It was also the site of the city’s first trade fairs during the medieval era (as far back as the 13th century). During those days, that […]

Article

Potsdam Museum

Potsdam Museum (Am Alten Markt 9, Potsdam Umland) – located in this outer lying area of Berlin, over 600 objects & artifacts of Potsdam’s history (from over the centuries) are displayed here, ranging from furniture, to textiles, paintings, sculpture and faïence pottery. This, along with models, interactive exhibits and multimedia presentations – all to show […]

Article

Paulskirche

Paulskirche (Paulsplatz 11, Frankfurt) – this is a church building in the late 1700s & early 1800s in the center of Frankfurt. Along with it being a church, Paulskirche was also the seat of the first freely elected German parliament, which gathered in the building’s circular hall. Paulskirche is a symbol of the German democratic […]

Article

Olympiapark

Olympiapark (Spiridon-Louis-Ring 21, Munich) – located to the north of Munich, this was the park that was built for the 1972 Summer Olympic games. This landscaped park contains sport facilities (such as an Olympic-size swimming pool), lakes, bicycle paths, concert venues, restaurants and a football stadium, as well as its landmark “tent-style” roofs. At over […]

Article

Nymphenburg Palace

Nymphenburg Palace (Schloss Nymphenburg 1, Munich) – located 15 minutes outside (west) of downtown Munich, this Baroque castle (built in 1675), was the summer residence of Bavaria’s royalty. Visiting Nymphenburg Palace today is like walking through a book on Bavarian history. The Kings and Electors of Bavaria left their mark here over a period of […]

Article

Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle (Neuschwansteinstraße 20, Schwangau) – this is one of the most visited castles in Germany and one of the most popular tourist destination in Europe. The castle is located 1 ½ hours southwest of Munich. It was built by King Ludwig II of Bavaria, also known as the “Fairytale King”. King Ludwig was a […]

Article

Naturmuseum Senckenberg

Naturmuseum Senckenberg (Senckenberganlage 25, Frankfurt) – this is the second largest museum of natural history in Germany. Famed German writer & poet Wolfgang von Goethe first came up with the idea for launching this museum – with a local medical doctor (Johann Christian Senckenberg) setting up a research foundation that eventually led to this museum’s […]

Article

Munich Residenz

Munich Residenz (Residenzstrasse 1, Munich) – going back to the days before German unification, when regions like Bavaria were independent and had their own monarchs, this was the former residence of Bavaria’s monarchy.   The Munich Residenz served as the seat of government and residence of the Bavarian dukes, electors and kings from 1508 to […]

Article

Mauermuseum

Mauermuseum – Haus am Checkpoint Charlie (Friedrichstraße 43-45, Berlin Kreuzberg) – the small building where “Checkpoint Charlie” was located (the once infamous crossing between Russian-controlled East Berlin, and the U.S.-controlled enclave of West Berlin), shows various items and contraptions that former East Berlin residents used in their attempt to escape to the West (such as […]

Article

Linderhof Palace

Linderhof Palace (Linderhof 12, Ettal) – located in southwest Bavaria (1 hour’s drive southwest of Munich), this is the smallest of the three palaces that King Ludwig II of Bavaria built in the 1860s. Ludwig II was inspired by the Versailles palace in France, as evidenced by the interior designed of many of the palace’s […]